About





Thoughts, musings and inspiration from a Right brainer.

Giles Peyton-Nicoll is a Creative Director and Visual Designer with a decade+ experience in digital media, bringing award-winning creative strategy, vision, communication, and management with an emphasis on usability for global brands. Brand development, advertising & brand campaign strategy, UX/UI design, social media engagement and cross-platform product development.

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"The people you work with

define the work you do”


I am very pleased to announce my new position as Global Creative Director for Enterproid. 

After the acquisition of Lightbox by Facebook I had a number of opportunities and seriously considered them all. After meeting the incredibly talented, smart team at Enterproid I fell in love with their product (divide), they understand the importance of design as a key differentiator in a world gone app crazy.

I believe that ‘Divide’ has the potential to become a hugely cherished brand, up there with the greats in the B2B space. I am really excited to be playing a role in the development of the brand and product,  I can’t wait to get my teeth stuck in.

My agency proposition ‘Devil May Care’ is still being developed alongside the work I am doing at Enterproid but I will be reducing my client base to a few key products.

Neuroscience Branding

How important is a strong brand image? A new study presented at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) shows that people presented with known brand images processed them in areas of the brain associated with positive emotions, while unfamiliar brands took more effort for the brain to process and activated areas of the brain associated with negative emotions. According to Christine Born, M.D., radiologist at University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany, this is the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to examine the brain’s response to branding. Twenty male and female subjects were presented with images of familiar and unfamiliar brands while brain activity was monitored by fMRI scanning. The findings were clear:

The results showed that strong brands activated a network of cortical areas and areas involved in positive emotional processing and associated with self-identification and rewards. The activation pattern was independent of the category of the product or the service being offered. Furthermore, strong brands were processed with less effort on the part of the brain. Weak brands showed higher levels of activation in areas of working memory and negative emotional response.

(Source: MRI shows brains respond better to name brands)

Although this may be the first study of its exact type, other neuromarketing researchers have looked at branding topics with fMRI techniques. In January, we posted Branding and the Brain, which mentioned research more fully described by New Scientist in How brands get wired into the brain. Read Montague, Director of the Human Neuroimaging Lab at Baylor College of Medicine, has also worked on branding – he tried the “Pepsi Challenge” while subjects had their brain activity monitored using fMRI.

Overall, branding is one of the more interesting areas in neuromarketing. It’s clear that individuals have strong and usually subconscious responses to brands, and as we better understand how that process works we’ll be able to develop more effective branding
strategies. Clearly, brand familiarity is important (as shown by Born’s study), but other dimensions must be at least as important. People are familiar with the Enron brand, but have few positive associations with it. And both Coke and Pepsi have universally recognized brands and spend massive amounts of money on advertising, but (at least from an fMRI standpoint) Coke seems to have an edge in brand strength. Stay tuned, I’m sure well see more branding studies in the not distant future.

"Change is tired of waiting."

"Those who don’t move, don’t notice their chains."

Steve Jobs: 1955 – 2011
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"Design is not about pixels, it’s about the space between them."

Creativity vs Mediocrity - A western parable by Jadal
 
The day didn’t grow darker, exactly. But the light shifted in a way that was almost imperceptible, the day that Mediocrity rode into town. It rode a limping horse with a second-hand saddle on which it balanced precariously. Behind it rode its army: Whining, Ambivalence, and Lame Excuses.
Taking a deep swig from its flask of Lethargy, Mediocre started to spit then decided it didn’t have the energy. “Well, well, what do we have here?” Mediocre said, with a mocking eye. “If it isn’t Creativity and it’s earnest band of overachievers.”
He took in our shiny uniforms, our gleaming stable, and our stamping horses. “How’s burning the midnight oil going? Those brilliant notions still waking you up in the middle of the night….” he drawled. He jumped as Critical Thinking threw a knife that landed right in the center of a nearby oak tree. “We’re not going to mince words Mediocrity,” said Critical Thinking. “ We aren’t going to bribe and flatter. We are going to focus all our energy on the most effective way to run you out of town.”
“What are we waiting for?” cried Good Ideas, hopping from foot to foot. “I have ten scalable solutions in mind right now. He’ll be nothing but a case study by the time I’m done!”
Visionary just closed its eyes and hummed.
Lame Excuses lurched forward. “It’s not our fault. The muse just hasn’t been in,” it shrieked. “We can’t create on demand.”
“There just hasn’t been time,” Whining trilled. “No one’s even explained it right.” Ambivalence started to say something, but settled for a smirk.
“We are here to run you out of town Mediocrity,” Creativity said firmly. “Hop on the raft of Malaise and go back to the lukewarm land of Status Quo where you belong. You have no place on the Professional High Road. I’m surprised you were able to climb this far anyway.”
“Oh, we may have cut a few shortcuts here and there,” said Mediocrity, smiling sweetly. “But we still got here, didn’t we, just the same as you.”
Just then, the Results Police rode in, with Metrics, Testimonials and Revenue behind him. “You aren’t the same as Creativity, Mediocre,” the Sheriff said sternly. “And we can prove it. Me and my boys have been watching you for a long time. You may have gotten lucky for a while, sped through a few assignments, took the easy way when no one was looking, cheated your clients out of decent output. We are charging you with jaywalking across the street of Hard Work, shoplifting fancy buzzwords to avoid genuine thought and prostituting the integrity of your profession. It was only a matter of time before someone caught onto your Mediocrity. Let’s go.”
Creativity and its army turned and left, each blazing its individual trail home.

Creativity vs Mediocrity - A western parable by Jadal

The day didn’t grow darker, exactly. But the light shifted in a way that was almost imperceptible, the day that Mediocrity rode into town. It rode a limping horse with a second-hand saddle on which it balanced precariously. Behind it rode its army: Whining, Ambivalence, and Lame Excuses.

Taking a deep swig from its flask of Lethargy, Mediocre started to spit then decided it didn’t have the energy. “Well, well, what do we have here?” Mediocre said, with a mocking eye. “If it isn’t Creativity and it’s earnest band of overachievers.”

He took in our shiny uniforms, our gleaming stable, and our stamping horses. “How’s burning the midnight oil going? Those brilliant notions still waking you up in the middle of the night….” he drawled. He jumped as Critical Thinking threw a knife that landed right in the center of a nearby oak tree. “We’re not going to mince words Mediocrity,” said Critical Thinking. “ We aren’t going to bribe and flatter. We are going to focus all our energy on the most effective way to run you out of town.”

“What are we waiting for?” cried Good Ideas, hopping from foot to foot. “I have ten scalable solutions in mind right now. He’ll be nothing but a case study by the time I’m done!”

Visionary just closed its eyes and hummed.

Lame Excuses lurched forward. “It’s not our fault. The muse just hasn’t been in,” it shrieked. “We can’t create on demand.”

“There just hasn’t been time,” Whining trilled. “No one’s even explained it right.” Ambivalence started to say something, but settled for a smirk.

“We are here to run you out of town Mediocrity,” Creativity said firmly. “Hop on the raft of Malaise and go back to the lukewarm land of Status Quo where you belong. You have no place on the Professional High Road. I’m surprised you were able to climb this far anyway.”

“Oh, we may have cut a few shortcuts here and there,” said Mediocrity, smiling sweetly. “But we still got here, didn’t we, just the same as you.”

Just then, the Results Police rode in, with Metrics, Testimonials and Revenue behind him. “You aren’t the same as Creativity, Mediocre,” the Sheriff said sternly. “And we can prove it. Me and my boys have been watching you for a long time. You may have gotten lucky for a while, sped through a few assignments, took the easy way when no one was looking, cheated your clients out of decent output. We are charging you with jaywalking across the street of Hard Work, shoplifting fancy buzzwords to avoid genuine thought and prostituting the integrity of your profession. It was only a matter of time before someone caught onto your Mediocrity. Let’s go.”

Creativity and its army turned and left, each blazing its individual trail home.

"Trapping, choke, bleed and shiner - Words I haven’t used for a very long time."

Stroking the cover, flicking through pages, admiring stock and finish.
Such a shame that design skills are not the only talents going digital. The print industry has gone digital as well. The artistry of decent litho and screen printing along with fantastic stock and finishes is vanishing as the 90s become a distant memory. Back in the days when I designed exclusively for print I coined a phrase “Sensory branding”, I would use this phrase when persuading clients to dig deep in to their pockets and go for that extra finish, that special paper. I would argue the case for ‘touch and feel’ being as important to brand recognition as design. 

“The weight of paper represents the confidence of your brand, the quality of stock your history and the finishes show how progressive you are, all of this is read subliminally by the recipient of your literature and becomes hard wired into their brand perception”. 

I believe that a good piece of design can stimulate a multitude of senses including touch; I even once added a scent to an Annual Report. I miss those days and long for the next opportunity to produce something with kinesthetic appeal as well as visual appeal.
A trusted practioner of these dark arts and someone who knows his stock and finishes is Ian from istprintingservices.co.uk

Stroking the cover, flicking through pages, admiring stock and finish.

Such a shame that design skills are not the only talents going digital. The print industry has gone digital as well. The artistry of decent litho and screen printing along with fantastic stock and finishes is vanishing as the 90s become a distant memory. Back in the days when I designed exclusively for print I coined a phrase “Sensory branding”, I would use this phrase when persuading clients to dig deep in to their pockets and go for that extra finish, that special paper. I would argue the case for ‘touch and feel’ being as important to brand recognition as design.

“The weight of paper represents the confidence of your brand, the quality of stock your history and the finishes show how progressive you are, all of this is read subliminally by the recipient of your literature and becomes hard wired into their brand perception”. 

I believe that a good piece of design can stimulate a multitude of senses including touch; I even once added a scent to an Annual Report. I miss those days and long for the next opportunity to produce something with kinesthetic appeal as well as visual appeal.

A trusted practioner of these dark arts and someone who knows his stock and finishes is Ian from istprintingservices.co.uk

"It takes both the sunshine and the rain to bring out the colours of a rainbow."

Mentoring at Seedcamp

I am mentoring the startups vying for Seedcamp funding today. Some interesting candidates. check out the teams here.